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FieldTripZoom Zone: Native American Heritage

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Cranbrook Institute of Science

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39221 Woodward Avenue
Bloomfield Hills, Michigan 48304
248-645-3200
https://science.cranbrook.edu/

The Cranbrook Science Center is part of Cranbrook, one of the world’s leading centers of education. Extraordinary, transformational experiences in education (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) is their primary focus of the Science Center and is based on a view that science literacy is vital to all aspects of our lives.

Native American Treasures of Cranbrook Institute of Science
Grades: 3rd-8thLength: 45 MinCategory: HistoryTimes: November 20, 2017 10:10 am ESTNovember 20, 2017 1:10 pm EST

This program introduces the virtual viewer the diversity of Native American cultures across North America by showing outstanding examples of Native American artifacts from the Institute’s collection. From ancient Paleo-Indian spear points to 20th century art pieces, viewers will gain an appreciation for the innovations of Native Peoples, past and present, in every aspect of living from basic survival to artistic expression. These grade appropriate tours also touch upon the ethics of collecting Native American artifacts and how curators care for their collections.​

 

Nov 20, 2017 at 10:10 am EST
Nov 20, 2017 at 1:10 pm EST

National D-Day Memorial, The

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133 West Main Street
Bedford, VA 24523
Email:
education@dday.org
Phone: 800-351-DDAY

On June 6th, 1944 United States soldiers, in one of the most pivotal battles of World War II, invaded the French coastline in order to propel German soldiers out of Western Europe and lead the way for victory against the tyrants of that era. Dedicated on June 6th, 2001 by president George W. Bush, the National D-Day Memorial was constructed in honor of those who died that day, fighting in one of the most significant battles in our nations history.

The monument receives an average of 55,000 visitors a year and is a profound addition to America’s War Memorials. Initiated by D-Day veteran J. Robert “Bob” Slaughter, the structure encompasses 88 acres at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains. At its center stands a monumental forty-four foot tall arch, embellished by the military name, “Overlord,” that was given to the crucial operation. The arch is highlighted by a reflecting pool that surrounds a captivating scene that is symbolic of the arduous trudge soldiers made onto the blood stained beaches of Normandy, France.

 

 

“Tsaakʉ nʉnnuwee—We Made A Good Landing”: The Comanche Code Talkers and D-Day
Grades: 6-12thLength: 45 MinCategory: HistoryTimes: November 21, 2017 10:10 am ESTNovember 21, 2017 1:10 pm EST

During World War II, the United States utilized Native Americans to create codes that the Germans and Japanese could not break. While the famous Navajo Code Talkers assisted in communication in the Pacific, Comanche Code Talkers were used for the European Theater of Operations. Fourteen of these code talkers landed on Utah Beach on June 6, 1944. Learn about their role on D-Day during this interactive session honoring the legacy of Native Americans in World War II.

Nov 21, 2017 at 10:10 am EST
Nov 21, 2017 at 1:10 pm EST

Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum

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Elaina Cunningham
Education Manager
2503 4th Avenue
Canyon, Texas 79015
Email: panhandleplains.org
Phone: 806.651.2244

Where else can you cover 26,000 square miles in a day on foot? From dinosaurs to conquistadors, you'll find it all in Texas' largest history museum. Relive the stories of courage and hardship, victory and defeat over the past 14,000 years. Step in and step back to the Old West in a life-size Pioneer Town, view one of the Southwest's finest art collections, experience the exciting history of the petroleum industry, and more. Click the video above to learn more.

PPHM is bringing interactive programs into your classroom. Topics include the Dust Bowl, Quanah Parker, the history of the bison, Wild and Wacky Weather and more! Programs are TEKS aligned and feature historic photographs, videos, first-person interviews and science experiments.

A Native American MVP
Grades: K-5thLength: 45 MinCategory: HistoryTimes: November 8, 2017 10:10 am ESTNovember 8, 2017 1:10 pm EST

An Indian’s life on the southern plains was not one of luxury. Indians were nomadic and had to carry all of their worldly possessions with them. This program will talk about the MVPs, or Most Valuable Possessions, of the southern plains Indian tribes. Using artifacts from PPHM’s Southern Plains Indian Trunk along with historical photos, we will discuss life on the southern plains. Questions can be tweeted to @laneybee22 prior to or during the program for a chance to be answered live.

Nov 8, 2017 at 10:10 am EST
Nov 8, 2017 at 1:10 pm EST

Virginia Historical Society

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Evan Liddiard, Senior Education Specialist
428 North Boulevard
Richmond, Virginia 23220
Email: eliddiard@vahistorical.org
Phone: 804.342.9689

The Virginia Historical Society (VHS) was founded in 1831, making it the fourth-oldest such institution in the nation. It has operated without interruption for more than 180 years, which makes it the oldest cultural institution in the Old Dominion. The VHS is the only organization dedicated to collecting and interpreting all of Virginia’s history—all areas, all time periods, and all people.

The Virginia Historical Society’s interactive programs offer informative and engaging experiences that bring history to life, while reinforcing the importance of primary source learning and historical inquiry. Our catalog of live, interactive programs covers all of Virginia’s history, from Pocahontas and the Powhatan Indians through Virginia’s role in the American Revolution and the Civil War to the dramatic changes the Old Dominion experienced during the twentieth century.

Finding the “Real” Pocahontas
Grades: 5-9thLength: 45 MinCategory: HistoryTimes: November 10, 2017 10:10 am ESTNovember 10, 2017 1:10 pm EST

This program will examine some of the many depictions created of Pocahontas over time, including the one depiction made in person. Students will learn how to interpret an image as a primary source, and through historical inquiry, determine which of the depictions the real Pocahontas is.

Nov 10, 2017 at 10:10 am EST
Nov 10, 2017 at 1:10 pm EST

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